Resources

Here is a repository of the latest research reports, policy documents, presentations, issue papers, and other relevant publications focusing on the area of ICT and gender.

Report on Trans Activism in Central Asia and Eastern Europe (cover)
This report on Mapping Digital Landscapes of Trans Activism in Central Asia and Eastern Europe provides a regional overview of digital organizing by trans activists in Central Asia and Eastern Europe, emphasizing shared patterns of digital usage, barriers to free and safe use of the internet, and resistance strategies to homo/transphobic-motivated censorship, surveillance, and online attacks.
Sex workers march in 2009, Mexico city
A zine on the implications of the new laws on sex trafficking that has implications for digital rights, rights of sex worker groups and sex workers. Though the law has been introduced in the United States of America, the implications are global as censorship curtails global platforms such as Skype, and could have potential implications on internet censorship norms globally.
The emerging sub-field of research around gender and digital technology is united in its understanding that gender biases and stereotypes are embedded in technology, and that this reproduces the existing problems around gender parity, gender-based violence, discrimination and exclusion on the internet. This report is a mapping of the research around gender and digital technology in the decade post the World Summit of Information Society (2005).
Illustration by Sylvia Karpagam
Here is a compilation of the submissions from different countries including Democratic Republic of Congo, Malaysia, Pakistan, and Bosnia-Herzegovina to the Special Rapporteur for Violence Against Women on online violence against women.
Digital technologies, with their diversity of tools and devices, their opportunities and risks, represent key spaces for feminist, queer, LGBT* and anti-racist political action. Contrary to the decentralisation and democratisation promised by the internet, it is now largely owned by large social media corporations, technology and service companies. In view of the struggles for power and narrative, we anti-racist cyberfeminists and cyberactivists who believe in a free and feminist internet believe in the decolonising of the internet.
Cover of Issue paper on Due diligence and accountability for online violence against women
This paper explores what online violence against women is; what can be done to stem and ultimately eliminate it; and whose responsibility it is to do so. It does this by building upon the issues identified in two research projects, namely the research on state accountability to eliminate violence against women by the Due Diligence Project (DDP) and the research on corporate and state remedies for dealing with online violence against women by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC).
Are you a feminist, women’s rights, sexual rights or internet rights activist? <br /> <br />Are you curious about how digital platforms and internet technologies have affected and impacted on how we organise for change? Whether this be new actors, strategies, issues, dynamics, threats, challenges or opportunities? <br /> <br />Join us in unboxing and re-imagining movement building in the digital age, and to make a feminist internet that is threaded through our collective work for change.
The BPF is collaborating with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the UN University on Computing and Society (UNU-CS) in its important endeavour to research and map projects and initiatives that aim to address different gender digital divides around the world. The objective of this collaborative data-gathering process is to help stakeholders better understand women and girls’ diverse needs in accessing and using the Internet, promoting gender equality, and investigating how ICTs can be leveraged to empower women and girls in line with the UN Sustainable Development Goals.
Surveillance powers of the state and corporations are escalating and are hugely assisted by information technology. Under regimes of colonialism and patriarchy, women, minorities and all other subjects have experienced being surveilled, enumerated and categorised. There is a need to now relook at how gender is implicated in surveillance practices in the contemporary. In this resource, Internet Democracy Project introduces a conceptual understanding of gender and surveillance, and 3 cases studies on mobile phones and access, safety apps for women and CCTV camera on women garment workers.