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Well, sometimes the name of a movement is necessary to give it validation, or to point to possible ways to take action, etc. But I agree it is not always necessary. I didn’t mean to imply that we should have a rubber stamp on posters that screams out “feminist” – there is no one feminist movement, nor are feminist values one-size-fits-all – they will vary dramatically according to country, culture, class, race, religion, age, history, etc. But I do think feminist reflection is necessary when developing social justice ad campaigns – do we want to perpetuate stereotypes or transform them? And what if perpetuation of some stereotypes means that there is mass interest in the specific cause we are trying to achieve, because people respond to stereotypes, unfortunately. I think we need to push ourselves to see how ads can have that “mass” (or even sex) appeal as creatively as possible, without minimising whatever ones’ feminist values are. Doesn’t mean we have to include the F-word in the ad, but we may not want to portray women in subjugated positions, or as victims of violence just because people may respond better to such an appeal.

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Well, sometimes the name of a movement is necessary to give it validation, or to point to possible ways to take action, etc. But I agree it is not always necessary. I didn’t mean to imply that we should have a rubber stamp on posters that screams out “feminist” – there is no one feminist movement, nor are feminist values one-size-fits-all – they will vary dramatically according to country, culture, class, race, religion, age, history, etc. But I do think feminist reflection is necessary when developing social justice ad campaigns – do we want to perpetuate stereotypes or transform them? And what if perpetuation of some stereotypes means that there is mass interest in the specific cause we are trying to achieve, because people respond to stereotypes, unfortunately. I think we need to push ourselves to see how ads can have that “mass” (or even sex) appeal as creatively as possible, without minimising whatever ones’ feminist values are. Doesn’t mean we have to include the F-word in the ad, but we may not want to portray women in subjugated positions, or as victims of violence just because people may respond better to such an appeal.
Posted on 05/22/2012 - 21:54 | Reply
I’m not really sure why the name of the movement needs to be made explicit in an ad campaign or even a campaign in general? I don’t see how it is useful in any way or adds to information about a particular human rights issue.
Posted on 05/22/2012 - 13:48 | Reply